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Coffee Culture in Vietnam and How to Brew Vie

Vietnam has been called a ‘coffee lover’s paradise’ among other complementary nicknames. The unique taste of Vietnam coffee differs so much from Brazil coffee or coffees from elsewhere in the world.

How it used to be in Vietnam, at one time, was under France’s control. It was a French-ruled country. The coffee of Vietnam and the culture of Vietnamese coffee comes from French influence. From the plantations to the cafes in Vietnam are all built in large part from French philosophies and French culture first instilled in the nation hundreds of years ago.

The charm, loving taste of Vietnamese coffee beans

Vietnamese coffee comes in many forms, the most popular is one created from the Robusta coffee bean. The bitter taste of the coffee here is solely attributed to Robusta beans which are more easily cultivated in this region than Arabica. The weather conditions and soil are ideal for Robusta, the reason why approximately 97% of the coffee plantations in Vietnam cultivate Robusta beans.

The rise of Vietnamese coffee from the 1990s to today

An economic liberalization hit the Vietnamese region in the 1990s. At this time, foreign investors poured into the country much like how a fresh brew of Vietnamese coffee pours into a heated cup. In this period, a lot of international coffee companies swarmed into Vietnam trying to cultivate relationships with plantations and crafting part of the market for themselves. It wasn’t long before Vietnam rose to being the world’s second biggest coffee producing country, only behind Brazil.

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What Are Vietnamese New Year Rice Cakes – An

New Year rice cakes, also known as ‘banh tet’, are a popular icon of Vietnamese culinary traditions. They are an expression of Vietnam’s national identity, representing culture and nationalism to a degree.

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The Rise of Broken Rice in Vietnam and the Ri

Broken rice was once called a ‘poor man’s rice’. It was looked down upon in a big way for years. These days, you will find broken rice in almost every dish from those served in school to kids to upper-class meals in a Vietnamese restaurant.

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Cultivate these Fresh Vietnamese Herbs used i

Vietnam is blessed to have its own unique collection of fresh herbs that are rare or unknown among Canadians and the Western world. In Vietnam, these herbs are grown routinely for a variety of purposes – some medicinal, some for our cuisine, and otherwise. This is a short introduction to some Vietnamese herbs used in cooking and medicine that Canadians and Torontonians may not be aware of.

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Why Vietnamese is the Perfect Bridge between

Toronto’s become a more health-conscious place, with every person seemingly leading a lot healthier lives than past generations have. Vietnamese cuisine has always worked well in the healthy eating trend as it’s largely a diet centered on a lot of greens and veggies, high in fibre, with strong energy-building carbs, and it’s easy on the stomach.

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The Best Vietnamese Street Food with History

Street food in Vietnam easily sits among the best street food in the world. It’s unforgettably delicious and is comparable to any family recipes passed down through the generations. Local markets, rustic food joints, and mobile food carts all play a role in crafting a very healthy street food industry across Vietnam. Here is some of the more simple, uncomplicated street food in Vietnam, brought to Canada with a Western flair!

Oc

Oc is sea snails. Though popular in Vietnam, these are unlikely to be feature in Canada just because the seas are different. Snail restaurants with fresh snails and shellfish are very common within Vietnam, similar to what you may find on the Atlantic or Pacific coast. Oc can be cooked by frying, streaming, sautéing, or grilling.

Banh mi

Banh mi is a French baguette sandwich, sort of like a Vietnamese interpretation of a sub. You’ll find banh mi packing elements like pickled vegetables, fresh chili, coriander, and meat of course. Banh mi is on street corners everywhere in Vietnam and is highly popular among the local population. Egg, chicken, meatballs, and more – take your pick.

Che

Che is a Vietnamese sweet dessert which comes in many different kinds of colors, flavors, and forms. Some will enjoy it as a pudding while others will prefer it as a drink or soup. Che is a word without strict definition, to a degree. It is more or less a common mish-mash of coconut milk, sweetened beans, rice, colorful jellies, fruits, and more. These are sort of like a Vietnamese ice cream-esque beverage that goes down great on a hot day.

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5 Vietnamese Dishes You May Not Have Ever Hea

Vietnamese cuisine is immensely popular worldwide, pulling a little from French colonial-era cooking, street food, and more contemporary, modern influences.

Perhaps the most popular Vietnamese food is pho – otherwise known as a soup with broth, rice noodles, herbs, and beef, chicken, or another source of protein. Another preferred Vietnamese food is banh mi which is a baguette filled with the most savory ingredients.

There are other Vietnamese dishes though, slightly less popular, which are just as delicious. They are as common as the ingredients they pull from – usually lemongrass, ginger, mint, coriander, cinnamon, chili, lime, and basil. If you’re looking to continue delving into Vietnamese cooking without the usual following you around, try any of these Vietnamese meals.

Bun ca

Bun ca translates to ‘fish noodle’. In different regions of Vietnam, bun ca takes on a different meaning in terms of preparation. For most, it’s a soup noodle dish served with fried fish. The fish is fried – sometimes deep fried – to a golden perfection. It’s then added to a broth sometimes containing things like pineapple and a fish base.

Bun cha

Bun cha is a Vietnamese dish similar to Japan’s dip ramen. Consisting of rice vermicelli, bun cha is served with pork patties, vegetables, and usually a dip sauce which could pull from vinegar, green mango, salt, and pepper. Some Vietnamese restaurants soak up oil from serving bun cha in sauce which makes them even tastier!

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