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What Does An All Vegetarian Pho Look Like – S

Vegetarian Vietnamese pho is a customized version of the popular dish that’s landed in households from Vietnam all the way to Canada.

Although pho is very nutritious and healthy regardless of what meat is in it, we understand more people are switching to a vegetarian or vegan lifestyle. Answering the call, there are many ways to customize pho according to the veggies you want to have in it. Here are just some of the most popular vegetables in pho, absolutely perfect for a vegetarian version of the dish.

Carrots

Carrots are an excellent choice for a veggie pho because of their taste and nutritional background. In carrots, you have plenty of vitamin A, antioxidants, and other nutrients. They’re very rich in minerals, fibers, and other vitamins as well.

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See Everything That Goes Into Creating The Pe

Broth is everything when it comes to pho. Most Vietnamese families, when they think of pho, naturally what comes to mind is beef broth. So much of pho is made from beef-based broth. Regardless of what meat or spices are used, it is the prototype for the dish.

There are several different ways to create beef broth for pho. For example, some prefer leaving the fat intact and skimming the bone afterwards while others make their broth only after eliminating the fat. Although many top chefs and cooks in making a beef broth will pre-roast bones with the mindset that it will create a deeper broth, most Vietnamese chefs will do no roasting and instead, parboil to arrive at a cleaner, healthier end-result.

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What is in a Wonton Wrapper

A wonton is an Asian-style dumping you’ll find used in Vietnamese cuisine frequently, pulled originally from Chinese cooking.

To make a wonton wrapper, the basics of the recipes use a combination of eggs, flour, water, and salt to form the dough. Then, on the inside, it is common to add mixtures of things like pork, shrimp, crab, spices, garlic, or green onions.

The history of wontons in Vietnamese cooking goes back centuries. It is believed that wonton originally referred to a kind of Chinese bread known as ‘bing’. The primary difference between bing and wontons is that a wonton has fillings inside, and is generally eaten after it is steamed or boiled.

Over the course of centuries, the concept of a wonton hasn’t really changed very much. It’s a classic Vietnamese or Asian-style appetizer usually included with a wide variety of different choices. With most wonton wrappers, you’ll find they exist in a small square, usually with a 6 cm length. The dough wrapper itself is thin and can sometimes be transparent when it is boiled. It’s made thin so that it takes less time to boil which evidently means if you boil it too much, it could come undone or disintegrate completely.

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What is Basa Fish and Is it Safe to Eat Basa

A lot of Vietnamese cooking builds from seafood and fish. Along the coast, the fishing culture’s strong and in Vietnamese cuisine, we have come to find so many uses for this protein source including in sauces, wraps, salads, and phos.

Among the types of fish in Vietnamese eating is basa. A white fish native to Southeast Asia, Vietnamese restaurants love using basa fish because it tastes and is similar in texture to cod and haddock but is more affordable. There has been a lot of misinformation shared about basa fish though. Questions continue about whether it’s safe to eat imported, whether it is healthy or a cheap replacement, and whether basa fish carries any significant health risks. Here’s what researchers know about basa fish and our take on the subject.

Basa fish has gone by many names in Vietnamese cooking, including ‘river cobbler’, ‘pangasius’, ‘Vietnamese cobbler’, and ‘swai’. In a sense, North Americans might recognize it as a sort of catfish native to Asia. Its’ flesh is light and firm, and its flavor is mild. Basa is most commonly eaten boneless as a fillet. They are usually imported from Southeast Asia, fished and packaged from the Mekong and Chao Phraya rivers. Also cheap to grow and harvest, basa fish continues to be in high demand all over the world.

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How Nutritious are Vermicelli Rice Noodles –

Used in a variety of Vietnamese recipes, vermicelli rice noodles are a staple of our cuisine. These soft noodles fill bowl after bowl of soups and phos. Contrary to what many North Americans assume, they’re not made from spaghetti but are rather rice-based. For those wondering more about the nutritious value and benefits of vermicelli rice noodles, here’s information on how they’re made and what they are exactly.

Vietnamese vermicelli rice noodles are made from ground rice, grown throughout Asia. These noodles are used not only in Vietnamese cuisine but also Thai and Chinese. Speaking purely on nutrition, vermicelli rice noodles are dense in calories and a high-carb food. Let’s make no mistakes on this. If you’re on a low-carb diet, this is not the right food for you. In fact, some nutritionists pushing low-carb eating will recommend to ask to exclude vermicelli noodles from phos and other Vietnamese dishes.

You may think vermicelli rice noodles are high-carb so they’re not worth having. That aside, vermicelli noodles contain little to no fat and are very low in sodium. We all need carbs to survive so if you have to have some, wouldn’t you rather have carbs that don’t come with any added fats or sodium – this is clean eating!

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Why We Marinate Fish and Seafood in Vietnam

The flavors of Vietnamese cooking are diverse, ranging from balanced yet spicy dishes to those plundered with herbs. Among the most popular foods in Vietnam, to this day, includes fish and seafood. Although it is sometimes served fresh or cooked without much interference from additional spices, much of the time we marinate our fish and seafood. For example, marinated fish with steamed rice is a chef special at TorontoPHO, bringing together Basa fish with black pepper, onion, fish sauce, and pork. To really get to know why we marinate, you’ve got to get some insight into how we cook in Vietnam.

Early on in Vietnamese cuisine history, two trends were somewhat obvious. The first of which is much of the population was very poor and did not have very many resources to rely on for high quality, healthy foods.

The second is that street food culture was on the rise, with many vendors seeking to prepare large amounts of food they could sell meal by meal to interested patrons. Speaking of, street food vendors are precisely how Vietnamese pho and soups became so popular. A vendor could prepare a large broth throughout the day in a sizeable pot and serve individual bowls one-by-one, pulling from whatever ingredients were available to them on any given day.

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Scrambled Salt Fish and Chicken Fried Rice Ha

Scrambled salt fish and chicken fried rice is a proper Vietnamese meal with a sizeable cult following to its name. Looking down on a plate, you’ll see a kaleidoscope of color occupying space. The rose folds of the shrimp, the golden fried rice, the marinated chicken pieces, and greens from the veggies. It’s almost like a piece of art!

In Vietnam history, a lot of fish and seafood is used across various dishes only because of how available fish is. Along the cost, fishermen caught fish every day, selling it to markets and street vendors. Fish sauce in Vietnamese cuisine actually comes from families and vendors trying to maximize the abundance of fish while using their favourite herbs and spices.

The culinary tradition in this part of the world of salted fish dates back to the 1300s it’s believed. There wasn’t a lot of food to go around. A lot of families in lower economic classes suffered because of it. With fish being so plentiful and affordable, and no source of refrigeration to store fish, salt preservation was the best method to prevent it from spoiling.

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